All posts by Remnant

World Machine Author

The Flu

I knew there was a reason why I made a “Random Stuff” category. This is where I post thoughts and random happenings from my own life that are only marginally related to WM at best.
Nothing slows work progress on WM like getting sick. Got hit hard by the flu bug last night and haven’t really been able to do anything but drink water and answer emails today. My own fault, as I had just finished an extended workout with an hour-long jog that I think kicked the crap out of my immune system for a little bit, because I got a sore throat and a cough just an hour or so later.

Anyways, the thing I’m currently working on (besides finishing up the Tiled IO support) is to finally fix the goddamn seaming issues in Explorer mode once and for all. Explorer is almost unusable at low-resolutions because of the lighting seams. Well, it’s about half-fixed right now. The seams are now fixed for same-resolution tiles, but don’t deal with the adaptive level of detail very well. Have to change the seamfixing method for that to actually work right.
Small little issues like the explorer/layout seams are the kind of things that drive me nuts, as they aren’t such huge things but they take up a proportially huge amount of development time.

Off to make some chicken soup.

Overlay Output Example

The Overlay Output device and all of its attendant code in the core and visualization modules is finished; just wanted to show people an example of the kind of visualizations it provides:


This is showing a terrain coverage map draped atop the heightfield. A coverage map shows what type of terrain is at that location. It’s NOT a terrain texture by itself; rather it’s a type of terrain metadata that specifies WHICH texture to use at a given location.
The coverage map was created by the Coverage Maker device, which produces an RGB-encoded image, where each color is linked to a type of coverage. This allows you to setup your terrain surface texturing for the game or 3D app. You would then (in the engine or the next tool in the content pipeline) map each RGB triplet to a terrain texture to use, and you’re set!

The coverage map seen here is pretty simple, using essentially three input maps: 1) A Hi-Slopes mask 2) A randomness map (basic perlin noise device 3) The Flow map from the erosion device. More details about the coverage maker later.
Anyways, back to the Overlay Output. Since you can also now load RGB images into WM as well, you could, for example, load in an RGB image that you’ve sketched out quickly, and then use the Overlay output to combine it with a heightfield you’re working on to match the sketch. Or lots of other uses — you can probably imagine more than I can.

One more image:

Example 2

Using a different map and coverage schema, and viewing in Explorer mode. Although it isn’t final texturing at all, it actually looks pretty good. It’s amazing how having some actual coverage-based coloration rather than just the height-based colormap gives a much stronger sense of realism for the terrain imho. Having this kind of coverage data available during heightfield creation, if taken advantage of, will allow for much faster terrain texturing on game maps and other such endeavors.

I think focus is very important for tools, and although adding RGB support to WM is certainly an extension of its grasp., I  think terrain type coverage is a closely integrated problem with terrain modelling, and that puts it right into the purview of WM. If you need the ability to output Normal Maps/Coverage Maps/etc, then you have it. Otherwise, it doesn’t slow anything down.
Back to work for now.

Usability versus Features

It’s always interesting as I develop World Machine, as there are always two distinct areas to add content in:

  1. Usability. Things that make the interface cleaner, that allow you to do things quicker, that are less confusing, or that provide additional power. This makes the experience faster/better/more enjoyable for the content creator.
  2. Output Quality. Things that provide a better result. These provide a better finished product, and are the ultimate judge of what a software program can produce. Doing a neat and clean job of producing some output isn’t much use if the output itself isn’t jaw-dropping.

I’ve always tried to put in new features in each of these categories. Since I’m taking a slight break from layout mode development for a little bit now that things are nearing feature-complete in that area. It’s always good to get some breathing room and a little bit of perspective — I’ve found that you can come up with some really interesting insights that you would otherwise miss if you stayed nose to the grindstone on that feature alone. In the meantime, the things that I’ve been looking at over the last few days and am currently researching, designing, or implementing are:

  1. Tabbed Toolbars. Sort your parts toolbar by Device Function (Generator, Output, Filter..), or Data Type (IE, a page for all HF operators, a page for all RGB operators, for Parameter ops, etc). This is something that I REALLY want to implement at some point for Pro, as it cleans up the parts toolbar enormously. The number of icons is really starting to otherwise get unwieldy. Status: Researching. This is something I want to implement, but haven’t actually started mucking with yet.
  2. Overlay Output. Not an output so much as an instrument or a view, it allows you to have one heightfield provide the geometry of the output, and another HF or a RGB image for the color. So in other words, you can superimpose a mask atop the terrain to see where everything fits into it, or drape your RGB texturing coverage map atop the terrain to easily see what types of terrain have gotten placed where. What’s really cool is that this works in Layout and Explorer mode too, letting you see your entire world with, for example, texturing placement maps put atop it, is incredibly useful. Status: Nearly Complete.
  3. Tiled File Input. This device stands to provide for some terrific workflow enhancements for alot of projects. Essentially, after setting up the input file stream (SomeTileXXX_YYY.bmp or whatever it may be), the device will load tiles from disk as appropriate to create a heightfield in the current render area. This allows you to seamlessly work with extremely large worlds — not just for export, but to continuously refine them by being able to load back in your tiled output. You can assign each set of tiles to any region in world space, at which point it’s totally transparent to the WM system– you can “zoom in” on a smaller subregion that spans only a few tiles, combine multiple tile sets in any configuration in the world, etc. For those working with paged terrains, this feature along with the tiled output will be worth its weight in gold. Status: In Progress

There’s other things that are also recieving work time right now — hell, since very little of the Pro code is 100% yet except for the multithreaded building code, many things are. The above are just a smattering of the interesting features being worked on this week that will make their appearance.

Lots of exciting things are afoot.

Layout Shapes

The shape distortion code for Layout mode is pretty much done now. Although with the optional override inputs you can certainly take specific control to achieve some special effects, it was important I think to have a minimal-fuss, built-in noise generator that would provide basic shape distortion without having to plug anything together.

Example Layout Shape

Above is an example of the output that WM might produce with the shape distortion when I’ve drawn a simple polygonal “U” shape. Of course you would then combine that with fractal noises and erosion to produce a terrain:

Final Terrain

For the next few days I’m going to be working on polishing off the last options for the Tiled Output code, and then things might well be ready to go to the Alpha team for first testing. There’s lots of code left to be written, to be sure, but testing work can start long before its 100% complete in that regard.

Professional Edition Progress

Those who aren’t in the Alpha team probably haven’t heard too much lately about what I’m up to.

The good news is, quite a bit 🙂

The Professional Edition of WM 1.x, which initially was going to be a rather modest expansion of capabilities to serve the game development/demanding artist market, is shaping up to rather profoundly change how you can interact with World Machine. With massively tiled terrain input/output supported, multithreaded builds and explorations, RGB device support, and other enhancements, there’s already alot there. But by far the coolest new feature is Layout Mode.

Layout Mode will eventually trickle down to the Standard and Basic edition releases as well. It’s ultimately something that is fundamental — it changes how you work with WM. Currently it’s really quite difficult to place specific terrain features in specific locations. Sure, you can hack together a network of Radial Gradients and other geometrical shapes to guide your feature placement, but it leaves a lot to be desired. Up till now, the only real solution has been to create your guideance masks in Photoshop or another app and then load them into WM, which definitely works but is not ideal.
Layout Mode fixes this problem, and lets you graphically design your terrain using vector-based drawing tools. You can create a layout in order to restrict the application of a filter in your pipeline. Or even more importantly, you can use it to create (or augment) your terrain shapes. By working with simple shapes, such as boxes, circles, polygons, spline paths, etc, you can create a resolution-independant specification in world space of the shapes of your terrain. Layout mode then applies fractal breakup algorithms to the shapes you have created to produce realistic looking edges. The output of all this can be used to guide the fractal terrain devices in WM to give them naturally bound edges. Sometimes, you don’t even need to do that — you can run the output from layout mode directly into the Erosion device and get a good looking result!

This is all done in a Google-Maps-style environment of a fixed overhead OpenGL camera that shares a core and terrain data with the Explorer mode. Even in the development mode WM is currently in, Layout mode has quickly become my favorite way to get a quick sense of what the terrain I’m developing looks like, as unlike Explorer you have a God’s Eye view of the terrain. You can then duck into Explorer from Layout and descent from your “place in the clouds” to fly through the world from that point.

The UI for Layout mode is currently embarassingly basic or else I’d post a screenshot. There are several testing cycles with the Alpha test team soon to come that will begin to refine the operations and usability of Layout (and everything else) in Pro. After it reaches a certain feature-complete level, the Beta test will open up.

The Beta test will contain a larger set of people. Included will be game developers, artists and studios, and serious hobbyists, who comprise the essential target market of WM Pro.

The Beta team still has slots open on it; if you’re interested in helping betatest the Pro edition, drop me an email and we can talk further. I’m looking for most likely around a dozen people or so to participate in the testing.

WM Dev Blog Opens up

Hey everyone,

Those who have been around for a while may remember the old development diary. It was a cool feature that has been supersceded by technology. The new Blogging software blows away the old hack job of a diary I had written, and the ability to use RSS feeds is very cool, and lets users/readers stay up to date far more easily.

Anyways, I’m going to try to keep this blog updated relatively frequently. Sometimes it will be daily, and other times it might go a week or so between posts, but I will try to keep everyone who’s interested up-to-date on World Machine progress. Note that some progress-related notes can’t be released to the general public, but are restricted to alpha/beta testers only. Sorry about that, but I don’t want to spoil the upcoming suprises that people have to look forward to 😉